Showing 33–48 of 69 results

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    S466 “Coda Bow Classic” violin bow, USA, early twenty first century

    $ 1,200.00

    The Coda Bow company is one of the earliest makers of good-quality carbon-fibre bows. Their “Classic” model is no longer in production but was at the higher end of their range, on a par with their current “Diamond GX” model. The stick is steady on the string and produces a clear, reliable spiccato and sautillé, a little closer to the balance point than most bows, so the bounce feels more “under the hand”. The articulation is clean, as one would expect from a good-quality carbon-fibre stick, and the weight means that the bow can pull a full tone.

    Start sale price: $1,200.00

    Bow weight: 61.5 grams

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    C408 Unstamped viola bow, European, late nineteenth century

    $ 1,295.00

    This unstamped, round, European viola bow has silver mounts and a hybrid version of the
    Vuillaume” frog, giving it good stability at the handle. Extensively restored in our bow workshop, the bow has a good blend of playing characteristics, combining steadiness in fast legato passages, precise articulation and an excellent spiccato. It is priced remarkably well for a silver-mounted bow.

    Start sale price: $1295.00

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    S337 Höfner, Germany, late nineteenth or early twentieth century

    $ 1,800.00 $ 1,300.00

    The Höfner workshops were established in what was then Austrian Bohemia in the 1880’s. From the beginning, they made a wide diversity of stringed instruments and their accessories for a burgeoning middle-class market. Then, as now, Höfner produced a broad range graded according to quality. This well-preserved early cello was made for the upper end of the market, as its silver mounts and selected, octagonal pernambuco stick can testify. The stick is strong and resistant to sideways pressure.

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    S346 Cello bow, F.C. Pfretzschner, Germany, twentieth century

    $ 1,500.00

    The Pfretzschner family included many fine bow makers, with workshops in Markneukirchen , who produced bows that are now considered among the finest by German archetiers. F.C. Pfretzschner, on the other hand, is probably an invented name, for no such bow maker is recorded. Nonetheless, this bow is reasonably well-made, with a strong, octagonal pernambuco stick. Nickel mounts betray the bow’s lack of a prestigious provenance; conversely, the lower sale price puts a very workable bow within reach of an advancing student.

    Start sale price: $1,500.00

    Bow weight: 82.1 grams

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    S448 cello bow F.C. Pfretzschner, Germany, twentieth century

    $ 1,500.00

    The Pfretzschner family of German violin and bow makers was skilled and prolific—at least twenty seven of them have found their way into the official violin and bow making dictionaries. F.C. Pfretzschner, alas, is not one of them, but rather, a fictitious construction used to market soundly-made bows for the advanced student market. This nickel-mounted cello bow is a very useful addition to that sector of the cello bow range, with a strong, round, pernambuco stick, an attractive pearl slide and Parisian eyes.

    Start sale price: $1,500.00

    Weight: 80.5 grams

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    S386 unstamped European violin bow

    $ 1,600.00

    This is an intriguing bow, made from snakewood rather than pernambuco, and displaying the characteristic dark stripes of this dense South American hardwood. Snakewood was commonly used for Baroque-period bows but is rarely seen these days. Despite the wood having a heavier weight than pernambuco, this bow feels surprisingly light in the hand, but produces a clear, warm sound. Silver mounts enhance its elegant appearance.

    Start sale price: $1,600.00

    Bow  weight: 66.9 grams

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    C425 Unstamped violin bow, Germany, early twentieth century

    $ 1,700.00

    This German-made bow is quite distinctive, despite its lack of an identifying stamp. The silver-mounted frog has unusually large Parisian eyes, and the head is also faced with a silver plate, an unusual feature outside the English workshops of W.E. Hill and Sons. The silver-coated thread lapping is also more commonly found in French bow making, though the deep, rounded head has its own character. The bow performs well, and at a very standard weight of 60.2 grams, should suit most advancing students with a relatively modest budget.

    Start sale price: $1,700.00

    Bow weight: 60.2 grams

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    S339 Cuniot-Hury workshop, Mirecourt, France, late nineteenth or early twentieth century

    $ 1,775.00

    Eugene Cuniot, also known as Cuniot-Hury, had a very successful bow-making workshop in Mirecourt, employing up to ten highly skilled archetiers, who were allowed to follow their own stylistic preferences under his supervision. This silver-mounted bow, with its round pernambuco stick, has outstanding playing characteristics, with a very steady legato, an excellent spiccato and a clear and responsive, stable articulation. Normally a bow from this workshop would sell for over $7,000.00. This bow is priced at a fraction of this sum because of an old head break, which has been previously spliced and recently pinned with a nickel-silver pin in our workshops.

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    S272 Bob Berg, Wellington, NZ, late 20th century

    $ 2,800.00 $ 1,950.00

    This is very representative of a number of prototype carbon fibre bows handmade in New Zealand by Bob Berg, an American double bass player in the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra. Berg later moved to Indiana, USA, where his carbonfibre expertise was refined by William Duff into the modern Berg Bow. Although the finish on the head is slightly rough, this bow has excellent playing characteristics, with clear articulation, steadiness in rapid legato strokes and a great bounce.

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    S424 violin bow, stamped “Dodd”, Germany, late nineteenth or early twentieth century

    $ 1,950.00

    Like many German bows of this era, this bow has been stamped with the name of a famous maker. Unlike most, however, this has silver mounts and a well-selected Pernambuco stick. The playing characteristics are also good, with a very even, steady response along the full length of the stick. At 62.3 grams, it is at the heavier end of the violin bow spectrum, and pulls a warm, rich sound as a result, without losing articulation.

    Start sale price: 1,950.00

    Bow weight: 62.3 grams

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    S303 German “Tourte” copy violin bow

    $ 2,000.00

    François Xavier Tourte, is for bow manufacturers, what Antonio Stradivari is for the 19th and early 20th century big mass-production violin workshops of Mirecourt, Markneukirchen and Schönbach – the star maker in the firmament, and therefore the name to put on countless thousands of reproductions. In the case of this octagonal, pernambuco violin bow, the copy, while nothing like the quality of its name-sake, is still a decent playing bow, with good strength and steadiness in the stick. The nickel button may be a later addition or it may be an original match for the nickel frog lining and Parisian eyes, in an otherwise silver-mounted frog.

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    S343 Unstamped, European, late nineteenth or early twentieth century

    $ 2,000.00

    Despite its somewhat plain appearance, this silver-mounted violin bow, with its round, finely-shaped, pernambuco stick, has a very attractive playing style, producing a characterful sound with good potential for phrasing and clean articulation. The frog has moderate wear but is in good, stable condition, an old stick crack has been professionally bushed and the tip face replaced, both repairs carried out in our own workshops.

    Weight: 58.6 grams

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    S392 violin bow, “Ch. Buthod,” Mirecourt, France, late nineteenth or early twentieth century

    $ 2,100.00

    Charles Buthod worked for Jean-Baptiste Vuillaume before establishing a large workshop in Mirecourt in the mid-nineteenth century, initially called “Husson, Buthod et Thibouville” and later famous as the French production house “Jrôme Thibouville-Lamy” or “J.T.L.”, of which Buthod was for many years a director. This bow, although it bears his name, was not made by him, but produced in Thibouville-Lamy’s bow department, where his name was used as one of a number of brands. The bow is steady in the hand, has good spiccato and articulation, and makes a smooth, creamy sound. The frog shape has been slightly altered at some point, which has affected the value, making this a very affordable bow for an advancing student.

    Start sale price: $2,100.00

    Bow weight: 61.5 grams

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    C404 Violin bow stamped “Bausch”, Germany, early-mid twentieth century.

    $ 2,185.00

    Description: There are many thousands of German bows stamped “Bausch”, in acknowledgement of the pre-eminent bow maker Ludwig Christian August Bausch and his two sons, but most of them are nickel-mounted and made for the student market. This silver-mounted example is of a higher standard. Although the head lacks the wide chamfers of most genuine Bausch bows, it has a pleasing, flowing elegance. The round stick, made of well-selected pernambuco, is very responsive, with excellent articulation at the tip and a clear but creamy sound.

    Start sale price: $2185.00

    Bow weight: 56.5 grams

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    S177, Unstamped, European, early-mid 20th century

    $ 2,200.00

    This silver-mounted violin bow has a round, relatively slender pernambuco stick. The round-backed frog is deceptive, for the bow, far from approaching a viola bow weight, is slightly on the light side at 59.1 grams, and feels even lighter in the hand. The stick produces a clear, crisp spiccato, and the sound and general response are smooth and elegant.

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    S287 Stamped “GERMANY”, late 19th or early-mid 20th century

    $ 2,200.00

    The round, pernambuco stick sits well on the string and draws a warm, clear sound despite the bow’s relatively light weight of 58.1 grams. Articulation in fast string crossings is good, and the bow produces a reliable, steady spiccato. Like many unbranded silver-mounted German bows of this period, this bow will provide a good playing experience for students in the higher grades, or for committed amateur players.

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