Showing 17–32 of 69 results

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    C389 Stamped “Bausch”, Germany, early-mid twentieth century

    $ 575.00

    Many German-manufactured bows from the early-to-mid-twentieth century are either branded “Tourte”, after the French “father” of modern bow making, or “Bausch” after Ludwig Bausch, the well-known German bow maker who championed Tourte’s style in Germany to such an extent he became known as the “German Tourte”. This bow, with its cleanly-cut pernambuco stick, is typical of the many thousands of good “Bausch” imitations. The weight is relatively low, and would suit a lightly-builted player or one who enjoys working with more subtlety of response.

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    C403 Otto Jos. Klier violin bow, model #156, Germany, early 21st century

    $ 615.00

    The Klier family have been making and manufacturing violins since Otto Klier’s father Johann Klier set up a workshop in Schönbach in 1887. The turmoil of WWII and its aftermath led to an eventual move to Bubenreuth, where the company, under the name of Otto Jos. Klier, has thrived ever since, making both instruments and bows. This bow has a round, selected pernambuco stick and Parisian eyes. It is very steady on the string in legato passages, has good spiccato and a clean articulation, and draws a warm, round sound.

    Weight: 60.1 grams

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    Vc58 “WooDIX”, Dictum, Germany

    $ 668.00

    Developed by the Dictum company, these good-quality carbon fibre bows have a wood grain surface with a high-tech carbon core. The stick is responsive and haired with Mongolian horse hair.

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    “Bravo” violin bow by JonPaul Bows, Utah, U.S.A

    $ 743.00

    Initially inspired by the innovative carbon fibre bows of Benoit Rolland, JonPaul Bows have been developing a range of carbon fibre bows for violin, viola, cello and double bass over a number of years. The Bravo is their “entry level” model, but is still a high-performance bow with good all-round playing qualities and a clean, attractively finished dark-brown stick for an affordable price.

    Start sale price: $743.00

    Weight: 60-61 grams

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    C405 Unstamped, Germany, early-mid twentieth century violin bow

    $ 750.00

    This bow came to us as something of an ugly duckling, its round, pernambuco stick disguised by a ruby-pink varnish and its lapping in shreds. With professional  help from our workshop, it has revealed itself as an excellent playing bow for middle-upper grade students, with a warm, steady sound and great definition, especially during rapid string crossings at the tip.

    Bow weight: 61.7 grams

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    C390 Stamped “Bausch”, Germany, early-mid twentieth century

    $ 795.00

    The modern trend with European bow manufacturers is to stamp a legitimate brand name on their bows, either that of a founding bow maker (for example, “Dörfler” or “Paesold”) or a simple brand name, like “Ary France”. Before the mid-twentieth century, however, bows, like violins, were often stamped with the name of an illustrious maker, a pioneer of the craft, such as Tourte. Ludwig Bausch was informally regarded as the “German Tourte” and we find his name on German-manufactured bows almost as often as that of his illustrious predecessor.

    This “Bausch” stamped cello bow has a strong, round, pernambuco stick, and bold Parisian eyes. At 83.1 grams, it is well-weighted to give a full, warm tone.

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    S112 Unstamped “Baroque” style late 20th century

    $ 800.00

    The round stick is made out of an unidentified, dark, dense hardwood and plainly finished, with no fluting or other decorative work. The ebony frog is alos plain, but the button is elgantly turned out of bone. This is a very serviceable baroque bow at a reasonable price.

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    “Arpege” violin bow by JonPaul Bows, Utah, U.S.A

    $ 988.00

    Initially inspired by the innovative carbon fibre bows of Benoit Rolland, JonPaul Bows have been developing a range of carbon fibre bows for violin, viola, cello and double bass over a number of years. The “Arpege” model was supposed to have gone out production, superseded by the “Corona”, but due to its persistent popularity among both dealers and players, it continues to be manufactured, sought after for its excellent set of playing qualities, combining steadiness, great articulation and bounce. At 60 grams, it is slightly lighter than the “Corona” violin bows.

    Start sale price: $988.00

    Bow weight: 60 grams

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    B920 Walter Mettal Baroque Bow

    $ 1,000.00

    “Walter Mettal” baroque bows are well but simply made for the advanced student market. This example has a pernambuco stick and a rosewood frog and button.

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    S314 “Dynasty” China, early twenty first century

    $ 1,000.00

    Bows made with genuine snakewood, as this cello bow is, are unusual, and generally confined to Baroque and transitional styles. Not only does this modern-style bow have a snakewood stick, it has a snakewood frog as well, attractively finished with abalone and brass. Although the stick is visually quite finely carved, the snakewood gives it extra weight.

    Weight: 86.7 grams

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    C388 “Wilhelm Raum”, Germany, mid-late twentieth century

    $ 1,200.00

    Wilhelm Raum’s workshop made a range of bows throughout the mid-late twentieth century, mostly for the advanced student market.

    This octagonal, pernambuco bow is a good example of his nickel-mounted bows, with a strongly-carved head, Parisian eyes and well-selected wood. The bow has a good legato action and articulation.

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    C413 “Schmitt*” violin bow, Germany, mid-late twentieth century

    $ 1,200.00

    This silver-mounted, octagonal, pernambuco bow is a very good all-round choice for an advanced student. The stick is steady on the string for legato work, and has a strong, resilient bounce and clear articulation. At 62.6 grams, it is at the heavy end of the normal violin bow range, and would probably suit a strong player, or one who wants the bow weight to draw more sound from their instrument. “Schmitt” is the name of a well-known father and son team of French violin makers, but this bow is unlikely to have any connection with them.

    Start sale price: $1,200.00

    Bow weight: 62.6 grams

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    C408 Unstamped viola bow, European, late nineteenth century

    $ 1,295.00

    This unstamped, round, European viola bow has silver mounts and a hybrid version of the
    Vuillaume” frog, giving it good stability at the handle. Extensively restored in our bow workshop, the bow has a good blend of playing characteristics, combining steadiness in fast legato passages, precise articulation and an excellent spiccato. It is priced remarkably well for a silver-mounted bow.

    Start sale price: $1295.00

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    S382 W.R. Schuster viola bow, Germany, mid-late twentieth century

    $ 1,300.00

    “W.R. Schuster” seems now to be a brand name on bows made in Asia. In contrast, this octagonal, pernambuco, nickel-mounted viola bow is stamped “W. Germany” on the underside of the stick by the button and has a personal provenance and history that places its manufacture firmly in the mid-late twentieth century, before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The stick is strongly made and with a weight a little over the average, will suit a bigger instrument. The playing characteristics are very good, with stability in legato passages and a decent articulation and spiccato.

    Weight: 73.25 grams

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    S346 Cello bow, F.C. Pfretzschner, Germany, twentieth century

    $ 1,500.00

    The Pfretzschner family included many fine bow makers, with workshops in Markneukirchen , who produced bows that are now considered among the finest by German archetiers. F.C. Pfretzschner, on the other hand, is probably an invented name, for no such bow maker is recorded. Nonetheless, this bow is reasonably well-made, with a strong, octagonal pernambuco stick. Nickel mounts betray the bow’s lack of a prestigious provenance; conversely, the lower sale price puts a very workable bow within reach of an advancing student.

    Start sale price: $1,500.00

    Bow weight: 82.1 grams

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    B763 European, unstamped, late 19th or early 20th century

    $ 1,600.00

    With silver mounts and a warm dark brown, octagonal, pernambuco stick, this bow is unpretentious and workmanlike.

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