Cello Bows under $5000

Showing 17–21 of 21 results

  • S334 Unstamped, Germany, late nineteenth or early twentieth century

    $ 2,500.00

    This old, much-played and appreciated bow has been thoroughly restored in our workshop so that it can go on sharing its playing qualities with future generations of cellists. The original, silver-mounted, ebony frog has been complemented by a new, silver and ebony button.

    Unusually, the head has an internal splice but no detectable signs of a head break. A splice makes an unbroken head more resistant to damage, perhaps echoing the actions of William Retford, Hill’s famous and fiery bow maker, who pinned his personal bow heads as a preventative measure.

    Weight: 75.5 grams

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  • S263 Stamped ‘Techler’, C. A. Reichel workshop, Markneukirchen, Germany, 19th century

    $ 2,500.00

    Despite the resemblance in the names, there is no connection with the Rome-based German violin maker, David Tecchler. The Reichel family were a numerous clan of luthiers and bowmakers largely based in Markneukirchen. C. A. Reichel stamped a wide range of student grade bows with the name ‘Techler; this cello bow, with its well-selected pernambuco stick and silver mounts, is one of the better examples.

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  • S259 Berg cello bow

    $ 2,750.00

    S259 Bob Berg cello bow, Wellington, New Zealand late 20th century

    This is an early New Zealand-made prototype for the now famous “Berg” bows made and marketed in the U.S. Bob Berg, an American double bass player in the NZSO, was a pioneer in the making of carbon-fibre bows. While his bow heads are not as elegant as modern productions, the sticks share the attractive, wood-like texture and colour, and the playability is very good, with excellent articulation.

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  • S298 Albert Nürnberger Jnr, Germany, after 1920

    $ 4,000.00

    This octagonal, silver-mounted pernambuco bow is well weighted, at 83.9 grams, and has excellent playing qualities. A head break has been repaired skilfully with a splice, which hasn’t affected the bow’s performance characteristics but has brought its sale value down to an affordable level for a professional player or advanced student.

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  • S294 “H. R. Pfretzschner, Germany, early-mid 20th century” cello bow

    $ 4,000.00

    Hermann Richard Pfretzschner, whose name appears on bows not only by him but by his sons, grandsons and great-grandsons as well, trained under Jean Baptiste Vuillaume in Paris before setting up his own workshop in Markneukirchen. This French training was to have a major influence not only on his own family’s work but on subsequent bow making in Germany. From 1901, the King of Saxony’s royal coat of arms appears, as it does on this example, in the right hand upper corner of the facing side of the frog. This bow is made from excellent quality pernambuco and would make a good bow for an advanced student or professional. It is well-weighted to pull a big sound.

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