Cello Bows under $5000

Showing 1–16 of 21 results

  • 3/4 size bow Carbondix “Futura” Green Crystal

    $ 133.00

    This is a strong, playable bow for a young advancing student.

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  • Korean stock bows

    $ 140.00

    Sturdy beginner bow with wooden frog. In 4/4, 3/4 and 1/2

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  • Vc53 Carbondix*** cello bow, Dictum, Germany

    $ 406.00

    Developed by the Dictum company, previously known as Gunther Dick, these well-made carbon-fibre rayon bows have a strong, stiff stick which, nonetheless, gives both flexibility and subtlety. The finish is very good and the value for money excellent.

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  • Vc54 Carbondix *** cello bow, Dictum Germany

    $ 406.00

    Developed by the Dictum company, previously known as Gunther Dick, these well-made carbon-fibre rayon bows have a strong, stiff stick which, nonetheless, gives both flexibility and subtlety. The finish is very good and the value for money excellent.

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  • C389 Stamped “Bausch”, Germany, early-mid twentieth century

    $ 575.00

    Many German-manufactured bows from the early-to-mid-twentieth century are either branded “Tourte”, after the French “father” of modern bow making, or “Bausch” after Ludwig Bausch, the well-known German bow maker who championed Tourte’s style in Germany to such an extent he became known as the “German Tourte”. This bow, with its cleanly-cut pernambuco stick, is typical of the many thousands of good “Bausch” imitations. The weight is relatively low, and would suit a lightly-builted player or one who enjoys working with more subtlety of response.

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  • C391 “Paesold”, model PA108C, Germany, late twentieth century

    $ 575.00

    The Paesold family have been involved in violin family dealing and manufacture since 1848. Third-generation Roderick Paesold’s early specialisation in bows gradually widened in the mid-late 1960’s to include good quality instruments as well, while maintaining a strong presence in the bow-making sphere.

    This bow is representative of their higher-quality Brazilwood #108 model, with a round stick, a bi-coloured lapping, and ebony and nickel fittings.

    Weight: 84.3 grams

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  • Vc58 “WooDIX”, Dictum, Germany

    $ 668.00

    Developed by the Dictum company, these good-quality carbon fibre bows have a wood grain surface with a high-tech carbon core. The stick is responsive and haired with Mongolian horse hair.

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  • Conrad Götz, model BC60, Germany

    $ 695.00

    The Conrad Götz company has been making high quality bows for many years. This brazilwood, octagonal bow is from the middle of their student range.

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  • C390 Stamped “Bausch”, Germany, early-mid twentieth century

    $ 795.00

    The modern trend with European bow manufacturers is to stamp a legitimate brand name on their bows, either that of a founding bow maker (for example, “Dörfler” or “Paesold”) or a simple brand name, like “Ary France”. Before the mid-twentieth century, however, bows, like violins, were often stamped with the name of an illustrious maker, a pioneer of the craft, such as Tourte. Ludwig Bausch was informally regarded as the “German Tourte” and we find his name on German-manufactured bows almost as often as that of his illustrious predecessor.

    This “Bausch” stamped cello bow has a strong, round, pernambuco stick, and bold Parisian eyes. At 83.1 grams, it is well-weighted to give a full, warm tone.

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  • S314 “Dynasty” China, early twenty first century

    $ 1,000.00

    Bows made with genuine snakewood, as this cello bow is, are unusual, and generally confined to Baroque and transitional styles. Not only does this modern-style bow have a snakewood stick, it has a snakewood frog as well, attractively finished with abalone and brass. Although the stick is visually quite finely carved, the snakewood gives it extra weight.

    Weight: 86.7 grams

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  • S314 Unstamped “Dynasty”, China early twenty first century

    $ 1,000.00

    It is rare to come across a bow that is genuinely made of snakewood, as this one is. Much-prized as a bow-making wood in the Baroque era, it has now been superseded by its South American co-habitor, pernambuco, in modern bow-making. This bow has a fine stick and an elegant finish, but nonetheless weighs over 86 grams, giving a refined but powerful playing experience.

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  • S338 “E.L. Herrmann”, Germany, mid-20th century

    $ 1,600.00

    This good-quality, student-grade bow from Edwin Lothar Herrmann’s workshop has an octagonal, pernambuco stick and nickel mounts. The stamp “E.L. HERRMANN” is one of a number of variations used by Herrmann, who also stamped the frogs with his family’s coat of arms. The stick is strong and resistant, though the bow itself is relatively light, at 78.6 grams. The Herrmann workshop produced a range of bows; the best are suitable for top professional use. This bow would suit a student in the higher grades who wishes to continue.

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  • S337 Höfner, Germany, late nineteenth or early twentieth century

    $ 1,800.00

    The Höfner workshops were established in what was then Austrian Bohemia in the 1880’s. From the beginning, they made a wide diversity of stringed instruments and their accessories for a burgeoning middle-class market. Then, as now, Höfner produced a broad range graded according to quality. This well-preserved early cello was made for the upper end of the market, as its silver mounts and selected, octagonal pernambuco stick can testify. The stick is strong and resistant to sideways pressure.

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  • S247 Bryant cello bow

    $ 1,995.00

    Percival Bryant, Ovingdean, England, early-mid 20th century bow

    Percival was one of the few distinguished English bow makers of the early-mid 20th century who did not train at W. E. Hill and Sons. He worked as a bow maker at George Withers for eight years, before setting up his own bow-making workshop in Ovingdean, East Sussex, in 1932. An angled back lining, and Vuillaume-style frog and stick fitting distinguish this bow physically. At 84 grams, it feels firm and forceful in the hand. A beautifully executed splice repair through the head has reduced this price to place it within reach of good players with smaller budgets.

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