Violin bows under $5,000

Showing 17–32 of 32 results

  • S303 German “Tourte” copy violin bow

    $ 2,000.00

    François Xavier Tourte, is for bow manufacturers, what Antonio Stradivari is for the 19th and early 20th century big mass-production violin workshops of Mirecourt, Markneukirchen and Schönbach – the star maker in the firmament, and therefore the name to put on countless thousands of reproductions. In the case of this octagonal, pernambuco violin bow, the copy, while nothing like the quality of its name-sake, is still a decent playing bow, with good strength and steadiness in the stick. The nickel button may be a later addition or it may be an original match for the nickel frog lining and Parisian eyes, in an otherwise silver-mounted frog.

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  • S184, Stamped “Dodd Ro. 8027”, Germany, late 19th or early 20th century.

    $ 2,000.00

    This silver-mounted bow has a slender, round pernambuco stick which gives it a light, almost airy feel in the hand. Both the stick and the frog share the stamp “Ro. 8027” plus an intriguing addition on the stick “Reg. lapping 595960”, stamped in tiny letters forward of the silver wire lapping.

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  • S181, Wilhelm Raum, Germany, 20th century

    $ 2,200.00

    Little is known about Wilhelm Raum except that he was a German manufacturer of bows during the mid-late 20th century. Most Raum bows on the market are nickel-mounted and of student quality, but this bow has silver mounts and a well-selected, responsive pernambuco stick. Although it is a little on the heavy side, the bow feels relatively light in the hand, and creates a smooth, creamy, warm sound.

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  • S177, Unstamped, European, early-mid 20th century

    $ 2,200.00

    This silver-mounted violin bow has a round, relatively slender pernambuco stick. The round-backed frog is deceptive, for the bow, far from approaching a viola bow weight, is slightly on the light side at 59.1 grams, and feels even lighter in the hand. The stick produces a clear, crisp spiccato, and the sound and general response are smooth and elegant.

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  • S287 Stamped “GERMANY”, late 19th or early-mid 20th century

    $ 2,200.00

    The round, pernambuco stick sits well on the string and draws a warm, clear sound despite the bow’s relatively light weight of 58.1 grams. Articulation in fast string crossings is good, and the bow produces a reliable, steady spiccato. Like many unbranded silver-mounted German bows of this period, this bow will provide a good playing experience for students in the higher grades, or for committed amateur players.

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  • B906 Bob Berg, Wellington, NZ late 20th century

    $ 2,500.00

    Carbon-fibre bows are now a commonplace, though the modern “Berg” bows, manufactured in Indiana by William Duff are head and shoulders above most, if not all, their competition. Back in the 1980s, when Bob Berg, then a bass player in the NZSO, pioneered this process and produced his early prototypes, they were an exciting novelty. These early bows, of which this is one, are visually a little rough, but possess the qualities of clarity and precision that the later Berg bows became renowned for.

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  • S315 Bob Berg, New Zealand, late twentieth century

    $ 2,500.00

    This early carbon-fibre violin bow was made in Wellington by Bob Berg, an American double bass player in the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra who pioneered carbon fibre bow-making technology. Unlike the colour of most later, internationally-made bows, Bob Berg’s early New Zealand bows, like the later “Berg” bows made in Indiana by William Duff, who succeeded him, have a reddish-brown colour and a visual texture very like pernambuco. The bow is silver-mounted, with Parisian eyes, and has very good playing characteristics. At 63.6 grams, it is a little heavier than the average violin bow.

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  • S188, violin bow

    $ 2,500.00

    This is an intriguing silver-mounted bow, stamped “DODD” as many German copyists’ bows are. But beside the main stamp is a much smaller one “No 0271”, with an additional stamp just above the lapping, also in very small letters: “PEG LAPPING 595950”. The lapping itself is unusual, starting with around 20 turns of silver wire which then alternates with black whalebone. The bow is particularly light, and may suit someone moving away from heavier sticks, particularly for the pre-Romantic repertoire.

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  • B818 “Rich Geipel…”, Germany mid 20th century

    $ 2,550.00

    Richard Geipel was a member of a large family of violin and bow makers. Based in the Markneukirchen area, his workshop produced many fine bows. This bow is characterised by large Parisian eyes and a bi-coloured whalebone lapping.

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  • S272 Bob Berg, Wellington, NZ, late 20th century

    $ 2,800.00

    This is very representative of a number of prototype carbon fibre bows handmade in New Zealand by Bob Berg, an American double bass player in the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra. Berg later moved to Indiana, USA, where his carbonfibre expertise was refined by William Duff into the modern Berg Bow. Although the finish on the head is slightly rough, this bow has excellent playing characteristics, with clear articulation, steadiness in rapid legato strokes and a great bounce.

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  • B580 “E. Withers. London”, England mid-late 20th century

    $ 3,070.00

    Founded by Edward Withers in the mid 19th century, this reputable London violin firm employed their own bowmakers. This bow has an octagonal stick, silver mounts and a one-piece button.

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  • S208, violin bow, Carl Albert Nürnberger, Germany, mid 20th Century

    $ 3,700.00

    This finely-finished, octagonal violin bow, from the Nürnberger workshop in Markneukirchen, is stamped “*ALBERT NÜRNBERGER*” and “MADE IN GDR”. These stamps identify the bow as the work of one of the more famous members of the numerous Nürnberger bow making family, Carl Albert Nürnberger, and dates it to the decades after the Second World War. The Parisian eyes in the frog, as Nürnberger’s work often shows, are unusually large, and the “Tourte” style head is carved with strength and clarity. The three-part, silver and ebony button is unoriginal. The bow draws a warm, full sound.

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  • S320 Howard Green, United Kingdom, early twenty first century

    $ 3,900.00

    Now resident in Fife, Howard Green, one of Britain’s best known makers, made this violin bow in London, as evidenced by the stamp above the frog. The frog is fitted to the round, pernambuco stick in his characteristic style, an adaptation of the Vuillaume method, without a frog lining, a design that helps to enhance a full tonal response. The bow has attractive red-gold mounts; the frog is inlaid with gold dots around the pearl eyes, a pattern echoed in the gold and ebony button. Despite the weight, the bow has a fine, elegant appearance, and feels quite light in the hand. Playing performance is as one would expect from a bow of this price and pedigree.

    Weight: 63.5 grams

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  • S305 “Berg”, William Duff, Bloomington, Indiana, USA

    $ 4,000.00

    Pioneered in New Zealand by Bob Berg, “Berg” carbonfibre bows were further developed in Indiana by William Duff to the point where they have established themselves firmly as one of the very best carbonfibre bows in today’s violin market. This Indiana-made violin bow weights 62 grams but still feels light and responsive in the hand, with the playing characteristics, shared by all top carbonfibre bows, of responsiveness and excellent articulation.

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  • S199, Doriane Bodart, Paris, France, 2009

    $ 4,200.00

    This is a beautifully-made bow from one of the second generation of “new” French bow makers. Bodart trained with both Gilles Duhaut and Stephane Thomachot, who studied bow-making in the early 1970’s from the famous French archetier, Bernard Ouchard, in Mirecourt. Although the bow is on the heavy side at 62 grams, the balance and the fineness of the head give the bow a sense of lightness in the hand, while retaining good articulation and tone at the tip.

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  • S266 W.E. H + S violin bow

    $ 4,900.00

    “W.E. H + S”, W. E. Hill and Sons, London, early-mid 20th century.

    Unlike some second-grade, “W.E. H + S” Hill bows, this example shows no signs of sogginess in the lower half but sits very steadily on the string, while articulating cleanly in all parts of the stroke. Despite weighing 62.2 grams, the bow feels light in the hand, while drawing a clear, full sound. Careless handling and repair have scratched the ferrule and destroyed the original silver tip face; the workshop maker is therefore unknown. The historian’s loss is the player’s gain, as the bow is being offered at a very good price.

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